Half a Bubble Out

The Basic Criteria of a Passion & Provision Company

November 3, 2014 / by Paige Gilbert

passion and provision checklistEvery day people start companies. Every day people go to work at these companies. Every day people are solving problems at these companies. In Gallup’s 2013 State of the American Workplace study, 70 percent of those who participated described themselves as “disengaged” from their work. This costs companies money and the ability to succeed. It also causes everyone in the company – from the CEO down to the janitor – to be robbed of their joy at work and in their life. Are you looking for a way to turn disorganization into order and chaos into a positive company culture?

What if you had the systems in place to have a successful small business that was financially thriving and a company culture that actually engaged all of your employees, all at the same time? It’s possible! The way we describe a company that is financially successful and full of happy thriving people is a passion and provision company. We believe work was intended to give us both passion and provision, and they aren’t mutually exclusive.

It’s time to take a look under the microscope and ask yourself, “Do I have a passion and provision company?” by evaluating if your business meets any or all of the following criteria.

Basic Needs & Operations

At the very basic level, a company with provision keeps you out of poverty. True provision in a successful small business is a job that gives you a paycheck, in a stable environment, created in a company culture where people feel safe, and experience a level of trust. It also means you have a sound operational plan in place to make your business work like a well-oiled machine. You have systems and procedures that work well in all areas of your business.

Financial Goals

When you have a sound financial plan and continue to reach your financial goals, your business runs smoother and better. This provides stability for yourself and for your employees. When people don’t have to fear losing their jobs and know they are working in a stable financial environment, they like their jobs more.

Sense of Satisfaction

When people like what they’re doing at their jobs – and like it a lot because they feel safe and aren’t faced with problems each day – they are less inclined to discuss problems at work. Problems are distractions. Fewer problems means greater productivity. The feeling of being productive and accomplishing the tasks they’ve been given allows them to go home at the end of the day feeling satisfied. That’s the beginning of creating passion.

Sense of Contribution

Anyone can be given a task and check it off their list, but when it’s something you truly enjoy doing you actually want to do it and you feel like there’s a means to an end. A company culture that has passion has its employees in the right roles where they are able to play their part to the best of their abilities and bring about a result that advances the overall goals of the business.

Sense of Purpose

Passion in a successful small business is more than just liking what you’re doing. It’s what you love doing. It gets you up in the morning to do something you would do whether you’re getting paid or not. Passion gives you a relevant reason of your impact and significance to the whole. Whether you’re the CEO or the janitor, you’re engaged at work, which means your company culture has happy employees and your business is run more efficiently.

We believe that a successful small business is meant to provide both passion and provision by meeting basic needs, financial goals, and giving a sense of satisfaction, contribution and purpose. If you want a company culture that has the systems and procedures in place to create an organized and efficient environment that will help improve the economy, improve your own financial well-being, and create an enjoyable place to work, we can help you get the systems in place.

Topics: small business, Passion & Provision

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